These are the Best TED Talks to Listen to While Driving

Top TED Talks
Whether commuting to work, on the way to an interview, going to the grocery store or wherever, something is likely playing: maybe the monotonous radio, CDs we’ve had for 10 years or your favorite Pandora station. More and more often, drivers are now tuning into TED talks, which are powerful speeches about big ideas by experts in fields ranging from science to business. TED is the nonprofit behind these short, viral presentations, which can be treated like podcasts, even though they come in video form.

You can make TED talk playlists and tailor them to the amount of time you have to drive, as well as what kind of mood you’re in. Some of the playlist moods are: beautiful, courageous, funny, ingenious, inspiring, fascinating, jaw dropping and persuasive. Once you pick the mood, select the length you’d like: 5, 10, 15, 25, 45, 60 minutes, etc. Then there are playlists for different topics, such as “Talks for Foodies,” “Embrace your Inner Nerd,” “Nature,” and “Be Here Now,” which include four to 10 talks. There’s something for everybody.

Here are some interesting individual TED Talks depending on the drive you’re taking:

Interview or Business Meeting

“Your body language shapes who you are” by Amy Cuddy 21:02

It’s normal to be nervous for job interviews. In this talk, you’ll learn how simply changing your body language can change your mindset and make you appear more confident.

Stand up straight and open your arms. Interviewees are rated mostly on their presence. Something as simple as standing with your arms up in the air, or “power posing” before an interview, can make all the difference in your confidence.

“Why the best hire might not have the perfect resume” by Regina Hartley 10:31

Usually the most valued candidate is the one with the flawless resume: a 4.0 graduate from Princeton who always had a steady job. But that might not be the case in some people’s eyes. The flawless resume candidate may never have had to experience hardship, pull themselves up from it and keep fighting.

Shopping Trips

“Let’s not use Mars as a backup planet” by Lucianne Walkowicz 5:50

Right now there are many disparate efforts focused on seeing if Mars could support life. It’s an interesting topic that’s fun to talk about, but at the same time we need to pay attention to our own planet, which has many issues. Instead of worrying about Mars, let’s turn our efforts to saving our beautiful home, Earth.

butterfly self medicate“How butterflies self-medicate” by Jaap de Roode 6:15

Many cultures learn about how to cure illness and wounds from watching animals. From watching butterflies, we can study the way animals self-medicate to better and more naturally heal ourselves.

Road Trip

“How can we make the world a better place by 2030” by Michael Green 14:39

Doomsdayers would say “no,” we can’t make the world a better place by 2030, but some say “yes.” Considering the world’s poverty went from 36% in 1990 to 18% today, there is hope.

Green’s witty British delivery talks things out in a calm, understandable way. He explains how we can improve human rights, poverty and economies in all countries of the world in the next 15 years.

“The art of stillness” by Pico Iyer 15:37

Iyer is an Indian travel writer whose favorite place to go is nowhere – nowhere meaning sitting still and thinking. No phone, TV or anything, just sitting still and reflecting.

In a world where everyone is on the go and always connected, peace and stillness are luxuries. If you don’t take time to sit and reflect, then you won’t have anything meaningful to share besides the usual rat race you’re experiencing.

commuting to workCommuting to work

“How to find work you love” by Scott Dinsmore 17:47

Warren Buffet famously said, “Taking jobs to build up your resume is the same as saving up sex for old age.” Most of us work lackluster jobs or jobs we just don’t like because we think we’re supposed to in order to get to our dream job. There is another way…

“Be an opportunity maker” by Kare Anderson 9:46

Today many sweat their self-interest rather than others. It’s a dog-eat-dog world out there. But what if we could learn to work together, each using our best strengths to make a difference?

A building is never built by just one person. Always be on the lookout for people who have a shared interest or passion, and seek opportunities to work on something meaningful together.

Doctor’s Appointment

“Why medicine often has dangerous side effects for women” by Alyson McGregor 15:29

During Word War II, doctors chose not to test drugs on women because if they were pregnant, they’d be liable for birth defects. They found that to be a good thing because the steady hormonal imbalances in women would make for unclear results. Ever since, clinical trials have been performed almost exclusively on men.

It has been thought that men and women have the same physiology, besides their reproductive organs. But that’s not true. In fact, women have smaller blood vessels in the heart, which means an Aspirin taken at a man’s dosage can be very harmful. Fortunately, efforts are now being made to better understand which drugs are healthy for women.

overeating tunaGoing out to eat

“The four fish we’re overeating–and what to eat instead” by Paul Greenberg 14:24

The four fish we’re overeating are: shrimp, tuna, salmon and cod. Eighty to 90 million metric tons of these fish are caught a year, which is the equivalent to the human weight of China’s population.

This is costly to the environment and especially the oceans. Greenberg suggests that we turn to protein and omega-3 laden mussels and seaweed for our consumption in order to preserve the ocean’s ecosystem. This could make you rethink that salmon you wanted to eat at your favorite restaurant tonight.

There’s a TED talk for everyone. Before you head out on your next commute, set your playlist to your favorite TED Talks and enjoy the fun, educational alternative to music.

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